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Two-year College Succession Planning: Utilizing The Mission Statement For Selection Of The Vice President Of Human Resources

Date Added: February 26, 2016
Author(s): Lucia Lacey-Nevitt
Two-year College Succession Planning: Utilizing the Mission Statement for Selection of the Vice President of Human Resources Abstract Colleges have a critical investment in the proper selection of key executive administrative positions with high quality leadership and character since leadership transitions can be unsettling and costly, and governing boards have a vested interest in getting it right. The problem is that two-year colleges are facing a strategic planning crisis because administrators fail to align the mission statement with a succession plan, leaving colleges struggling to plan for replacing key administrative positions. This qualitative case study analyzed the best strategy for the selection process of executive college administrative positions, specifically the Vice President of Human Resources. This study was undertaken because of the limited research on the ways in which college mission statements can guide the strategic succession planning for executive administrative positions. The study employed a purposive sample of six human resource college administrators, and utilized multiple data sources: person-to-person interviews, focus group interview, and the Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) Survey. The results of this study provided knowledge to academic administrators on the value of recognizing that a mission statement must guide succession planning for effective leadership development. Future research could utilize a larger sample of two-year colleges to strengthen generalizability of these findings. The integration of a multi-case/multi-site study into future research designs could improve the comprehensiveness nature of the results and allow for further comparative analysis between other two-year colleges. Knowledge derived from this study could contribute even more transparency in regard to the multitude of variables that contribute to the ways in which a two-year college mission statement guides the strategic succession plan for key administrative positions.
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"You Can Go Your Own Way": Community Colleges' Responses To Neoliberal Policy

Date Added: February 21, 2016
Author(s): John S. Levin, Marie Christine Martin, Ariadna I. López-Damián, Michael J. Hoggatt
This qualitative, longitudinal study focuses on neoliberal policy and practice in three U.S. community colleges in three states over a 25 year period. A narrative analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators and content analysis of institutional documents and policies revealed that both state and institutional policy and organizational behaviors emphasized program completion (including credentialing) and student learning outcomes, on the one hand, and state policy emphasized a globally competitive workforce and economic development, on the other hand. Findings indicate that although state policies focused on efficiency and performativity, neoliberalism in community colleges is not monolithic. Individual colleges responded in unique ways as they sought to respond to policy demands while endeavoring to maintain their missions and pursue their own local goals.
Citation: Levin, J., Martin, M.C., Lopez-Damian, A.I. & Hoggat, M. (2016). "You Can Go Your Own Way": Community Colleges' Responses to Neoliberal Policy. Research Paper for the Annual Meeting of the Council for the Study of Community Colleges. Texas.
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Questions Frequently Asked By Graduate Students

Date Added: February 10, 2016
Author(s): Bob Barber, Sue Kater, and Other CSCC Members
This document contains answers to questions frequently asked by graduate students at CSCC conferences who are interested in working at or conducting research at community colleges. It can be used at higher education leadership programs and other forums where graduate students are seeking to learn more about the community college world.
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The Argument For Community College Baccalaureate Programs

Date Added: December 18, 2015
Author(s): Alan Stage
This paper investigates the need for community colleges to offer baccalaureate degrees. A research of the literature examined the need for this type of degree as well as how it fits with the mission of the community college. This paper will argue that the literature indicates both a need for these programs as well as the ability and willingness for community colleges to deliver them. The literature also shows, however, a gap in available research on the outcomes achieved by community colleges offering these programs.
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Women In Higher Education: Spanning The Gap From Faculty To President

Date Added: December 18, 2015
Author(s): Jennifer A. McConville
The population of the United States is over half female. Women in the United States receive 57 percent of higher education degrees awarded each year. With these numbers continually increasing, one might assume the number of women leaders in our colleges are also growing at the same rate. They are not. This paper looks at the arguments behind why the ratios are not growing at a faster percentage. It also examines possible ways to start changing that trend.
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Providing Social And Cultural Capital To Low-Income College Students

Date Added: December 18, 2015
Author(s): Vanessa Meinberg
This paper discusses issues facing low-income students in relation to degree-attainment and success rates at community colleges. Topics discussed include analyzing barriers this population faces using the socio-cultural theory and recommendations for action implementing Tinto's (1975) Interactionalist Model of Student Persistence. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed as well. Keywords: Community College, Graduation Rates, Low-Income
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Community College Faculty And Shared Governance

Date Added: December 18, 2015
Author(s): Miles Young
Community colleges currently face a crisis is governance in which globalization and the neo-liberal agenda have dictated how many administrators have chosen to structure their organizations. Consequently, faculty at these institutions have found themselves marginalized in this new corporate model. Shared governance, in response, provides a framework that scholars and practitioners can use to maintain community colleges' relevance in today's global market while ensuring the inclusion of faculty in institutional decision-making.
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A Growing Need For Collaborative & Participative Leadership

Date Added: December 17, 2015
Author(s): Garrett D. Nogan
This position paper details the current climate and challenges of higher education. It highlights the challenges and myriad of issues specifically facing community colleges. While there are many types of leadership, collaborative leadership plays an overwhelming role in enabling community colleges to be successful now and in the future. Meeting multiple missions, maintaining organizational survival, expanding its reach, and meeting diversity needs are all challenges that are best solved through collaborative and participative leadership. While this leadership approach isn't flawless, drawbacks and counter-arguments will also be identified.
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Improving Online Instruction Through Collaborative Information Literacy And Open Educational Resources In Community Colleges

Date Added: December 16, 2015
Author(s): Holli Duggan
The purpose of this paper is to provide recommendations for increasing the use, revision, and development of open educational resources (OER) through closer collaborative partnerships with community college librarians to increase information literacy instruction. OER are defined as educational materials that are licensed to use freely which include learning objects such as videos, digital textbooks, learning modules, and lessons. Collaborative instruction efforts and the integration of OER can lessen financial burdens, enhance traditional curriculums, and help students' transition to effective online learners.
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Certificate Programs As The 1st Step On A Career Pathway Out Of Poverty

Date Added: December 15, 2015
Author(s): Janet K. Gill
With the open access model of community colleges and a goal of providing opportunities to all, we are challenged with helping those with the highest financial need find opportunities to better themselves and support their families. Community colleges have historically provided programming that gets people into career areas that can provide good living wages. One of the challenges those in poverty encounter as they look to education for the first step of their career is the unavailability of funding for certificate and short-term training programs. With this paper I will outline critical challenges we must address to assist those in poverty. I will also outline strategies to ensure successful attainment of educational goals that will advance financial security. In particularly, I will describe the constraint at most colleges that limits the availability of FAFSA funding for certificate programs
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The Indiana Story: How The Extension Movement Was Won

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Shaila Danielle Mulholland
While new community colleges proliferated across the nation during the 1950s and 1960s, Indiana's postsecondary educational leaders pursued an alternative route to expanding educational opportunity during the postwar years through extension campuses. The study reported in this article draws on archival documents to gain an understanding of the rationale and motivations for opposing community college development in Indiana during the 1950s and the 1960s. Two research questions guided this analysis. First, how did state and educational leaders frame the issues, problems, and alternatives related to the expansion of post-high school educational opportunities? Second, why did policy actors in Indiana choose strategies different from those selected by most other states?
Citation: Mulholland, S. D. (2012). The Indiana story: How the extension movement was won. Community College Review, 40, 340-360. doi: 10.1177/0091552112458150
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Students With Disabilities At 2-Year Institutions In The United States: Factors Related To Success

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Ketevan Mamiseishvili, and Lynn C. Koch
This study used data from the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study to examine the demographic and in-college characteristics of students with disabilities at 2-year institutions, identify the types of educational services available to them, and determine how students' disability conditions and their selected demographic and in-college characteristics related to their persistence. Nearly 25% of the students with disabilities in the sample did not persist beyond their first year, and almost 51% left without return by the end of their third year. The results from chi-square tests revealed that nonpersistence was associated with depression, physical or orthopedic conditions and other conditions not specified in the survey. Delayed enrollment decreased the likelihood of both first-to-second and 3-year persistence. Conversely, full-time enrollment, high grade point averages (GPAs), high degree aspirations, and meetings with academic advisors were positively related to persistence. Recommendations for faculty members, administrators, and disability services staff members at 2-year institutions are provided.
Citation: Mamiseishvili, K., & Koch, L. C. (2012). Students with disabilities at 2-year institutions in the united states: Factors related to success. Community College Review, 40, 320-339. doi: 10.1177/0091552112456281
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Stability Of Educational Expectations Among Baccalaureate Aspirants Beginning At Community Colleges

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Xueli Wang
Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, this study explored factors that predict stability of educational expectations among baccalaureate aspirants beginning at community colleges. Based on a nationally representative sample of baccalaureate-aspiring high school seniors of 2004 who entered community colleges as their first postsecondary institutions, this study tested a logistic regression model and found that among precollege characteristics, students' SES and perceived importance of getting a good education were positively related to the likelihood of retaining baccalaureate expectations 2 years after high school graduation. Among postsecondary predictors, the likelihood of students' persistence in baccalaureate expectations was positively influenced by interaction with faculty members outside of class and studying in school libraries, but was negatively associated with having reading remediation, receiving financial aid, and being married. These findings have implications for community colleges in providing effective educational practices to help students move forward toward their degree goals.
Citation: Wang, X. (2012). Stability of educational expectations among baccalaureate aspirants beginning at community colleges. Community College Review, 40, 300-319. doi: 10.1177/0091552112454914
Categories: Student Success
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Japanese Female Students' Perceptions Of 2-Year Colleges As A Choice For Postsecondary Education

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Shinobu Anzai, and Chie Matsuzawa Paik
Two-year colleges have played an important role in providing postsecondary education for women in postwar Japan. More recently, a dwindling college-bound population in Japan has resulted in a drastic decrease in the number of and enrollment in 2-year colleges. This study explored the motivations and aspirations of 12 Japanese female students to understand the factors influencing their choice of a 2-year college. Findings suggest that 2-year college administrators and faculty members need to hear the voices of female students in today's society. This will enhance the colleges' role in community-based higher education and help them better serve the interests of prospective students and the needs of regional businesses and industries. Findings are discussed in the context of contemporary Japanese society.
Citation: Anzai, S., & Paik, C. M. (2012). Japanese female students' perceptions of 2-year colleges as a choice for postsecondary education. Community College Review, 40, 279-299. doi: 10.1177/0091552112454674
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Hiring Diverse Faculty Members In Community Colleges: A Case Study In Ethical Decision Making

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Eugene Oropeza Fujimoto
This case study examines why 2-year colleges struggle to increase the racial diversity of their faculty. Through interrogating hiring procedures and identifying reasonable expectations for diversity within a college faculty, ethical dilemmas and practical implications of efforts to increase the hiring of faculty members of color emerge.
Citation: Fujimoto, E. O. (2012). Hiring diverse faculty members in community colleges: A case study in ethical decision making. Community College Review, 40, 255-274. doi: 10.1177/0091552112450069
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An Ethical Decision-Making Framework For Community College Administrators

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Diane E. Oliver, and Barbara Hioco
This article provides community college administrators, as well as university faculty members who teach doctoral and master's courses in community college leadership, with a framework that facilitates ethical decision making. Administrators' decisions must be grounded in critical thinking that includes ethical considerations.
Citation: Oliver, D. E., & Hioco, B. (2012). An ethical decision-making framework for community college administrators. Community College Review, 40, 240-254. doi: 10.1177/0091552112445611
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Whither Utility And Duty? A Case For Virtue In Community College Administration

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Geoffrey Propheter, and Su Jin Jez
Recent improprieties by community college administrators have scarred the public trust. Efforts to secure against maladministration are firmly rooted in utilitarian and deontological ethics. In this article, the authors argue that these common approaches cannot remedy maladministration in the community college because utilitarianism and deontology are part of the problem and, therefore, cannot be part of the solution. Instead, the authors make the case that virtue ethics provides the best framework for moral community college administration while also being the best means of restoring public trust.
Citation: Propheter, G., & Jez, S. J. (2012). Whither utility and duty? A case for virtue in community college administration. Community College Review, 40, 215-239. doi: 10.1177/0091552112450460
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Five Ethical Paradigms For Community College Leaders: Toward Constructing And Considering Alternative Courses Of Action In Ethical Decision Making

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): J. Luke Wood, and Adriel A. Hilton
This article encourages community college leaders to employ ethical paradigms when constructing and considering alternative courses of action in decision-making processes. The authors discuss four previously articulated paradigms (e.g., ethic of justice, ethic of critique, ethic of care, and ethic of the profession) and propose an additional paradigm--the ethic of local community. The ethic of local community is a communitarian and utilitarian frame embodied by the philosophical underpinnings and mission of the community college. Questions designed for praxis are proffered following a discourse on how each paradigm is defined and described in extant literature.
Citation: Wood, J. L., & Hilton, A. A. (2012). Five ethical paradigms for community college leaders: Toward constructing and considering alternative courses of action in ethical decision making. Community College Review, 40, 196-214. doi: 10.1177/0091552112448818
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Looking Behind Community College Budgets For Future Policy Considerations

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Richard M. Romano
This study reviews the historical trend of college revenues and expenditures from a national perspective using primarily data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) as reported by the Delta Project for the years 1999-2009. Looking at trends related to state and local appropriations, college costs and prices, output, and productivity, it argues that various policy issues flow from these trends. The recommendations that follow are not precise prescriptions for legislative action, but rather suggestions for the direction of public and institutional policy that invite further reflection and research.
Citation: Romano, R. M. (2012). Looking behind community college budgets for future policy considerations. Community College Review, 40, 165-189. doi: 10.1177/0091552112441824
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A Realistic Look At STEM And The Role Of Community Colleges

Date Added: October 23, 2015
Author(s): Linda Serra Hagedorn, and Agustina Veny Purnamasari
American policy makers, educators, and others are concerned that predicted workforce shortages in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields will have a catastrophic impact on the economy. This article takes a realistic look at the "STEM problem," identifying how community colleges can be a part of the solution. We provide evidence that shortages in STEM workers vary by geographic locale. Furthermore, STEM achievement is not consistent across ethnic groups or between men and women. These gaps may be due to unequal access to STEM degree programs and the shortage of quality STEM teachers.
Citation: Hagedorn, L. S., & Purnamasari, A. V. (2012). A Realistic look at STEM and the role of community colleges. Community College Review, 40, 145-164. doi: 10.1177/0091552112443701
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